Our Blog

When do children usually lose their baby teeth?

November 18th, 2020

Many parents have concerns about their children’s teeth not falling out on time. Drs. LaRee Johnson, Clark Morris, Gentry Byrd, and Anne Baker and our team are here to answer any questions parents may have about when children lose their teeth.

Children have 20 primary teeth that usually come in before age three. By about age six, these teeth will loosen and begin to fall out on their own to make room for the permanent ones. It is common for girls to lose their baby teeth earlier than boys. Most children lose their final baby tooth by age 13.

Baby teeth normally fall out in the order in which they came in. The lower center incisors are usually the first to fall, around age six or seven, followed by the upper central incisors.

If a child loses a tooth to decay or an accident, the permanent tooth may come in too early and take a crooked position due to teeth crowding. If your child loses a tooth to decay or accident, call Drs. LaRee Johnson, Clark Morris, Gentry Byrd, and Anne Baker to make an appointment.

Some kids can’t wait for their baby teeth to fall out, while others dread the thought of losing a tooth. When your child begins to lose teeth, you should emphasize the importance of proper dental care on a daily basis to promote a healthy mouth.

Remember to:

  • Help your child to brush his or her teeth at least twice a day
  • Help your child floss at bedtime
  • Limit eating and drinking between meals and at bedtime, especially sugary treats and drinks
  • Schedule regular dental visits for your child every six months.
  • Ask about the use of fluoride treatments and dental sealants to help prevent tooth decay.

Call Carolina Pediatric Dentistry to learn more about caring for baby teeth or to schedule an appointment at our Downtown Raleigh and North Raleigh/Wakefield offices!

What is a pediatric dentist?

November 11th, 2020

Our team at Carolina Pediatric Dentistry hears this question a lot. According to our friends at the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD), pediatric dentistry is “an age-defined specialty that provides both primary and comprehensive preventive and therapeutic oral healthcare for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special healthcare needs.”

Pediatric dentists, such as Drs. LaRee Johnson, Clark Morris, Gentry Byrd, and Anne Baker, are dedicated to the oral health of our young patients from infancy through their teen years. Our team at Carolina Pediatric Dentistry has the experience and qualifications to care for your child’s teeth, gums, and mouth throughout his or her various stages of childhood.

Pediatric dentists complete at four years of dental school with an additional 2-3 years of specialty residency training afterwards.

At Carolina Pediatric Dentistry, we know children are not born with a fear of the dentist, but they can fear the unknown. Drs. LaRee Johnson, Clark Morris, Gentry Byrd, and Anne Baker and our team know how to treat children in ways that make them relaxed and comfortable.

To learn more about pediatric dentistry, or to schedule your child's next visit at our Downtown Raleigh or North Raleigh/Wakefield office locations, please give us a call today!

Make your child’s next visit to our office great!

October 14th, 2020

If you have been bringing your baby in for regular checkups since that first tooth arrived, you might expect that he or she is already familiar with Drs. LaRee Johnson, Clark Morris, Gentry Byrd, and Anne Baker and our staff. Often, though, months pass between visits, which is a very long time for a child. How can you make your preschooler’s return visit a happy one? We have some suggestions!

Before Your Visit

  • Prepare your child for her visit. Simple explanations are best for a young child. You might tell your daughter that a dentist is a doctor who helps keep her teeth strong and healthy. Let her know a bit about what will happen. Being told, “You will sit in a special chair,” or, “Can you open wide so we can count your teeth?” will give her some idea of what it’s like to visit our office.
  • There are many entertaining books for young children about visiting the dentist. Reading some of these to her for a few days before the appointment will let her know what to expect.
  • Use playtime to prepare. You might count your daughter’s teeth or let her “play dentist” and brush the teeth of her favorite doll or stuffed animal.

When You Arrive

  • Your attitude can be contagious! If you treat a visit to the dentist like any other outing, chances are your child will too. Your calm presence is exactly what your child needs.
  • You might want to come a bit early to let your son explore the office. Bring a favorite toy or book to keep him entertained if you need to. A favorite stuffed toy can be a comfort in an unfamiliar place.
  • If you are with your child during his checkup, follow our lead. Don’t be concerned if your child seems uncooperative at first or even throws a tantrum—we are used to working with children, and have techniques to make his experience as relaxed and as positive as we possibly can.

We Are Here to Help

We are your partners in your child’s dental care. Call our office anytime for suggestions about making your child’s visit a comfortable experience. Our goal is to start your child confidently on the road to a lifetime of happy dental visits!

Are baby teeth really that important?

September 30th, 2020

Your infant’s first teeth will begin to appear around six to 12 months of age. You might wonder how important these primary teeth really are--we get questions all the time about why baby teeth matter when they are destined to fall out within a few years and be replaced by a full set of permanent teeth. However, baby teeth have important functions, and proper care can set the stage for excellent oral and overall health.

The truth is, baby teeth (known as primary teeth), allow children to chew, speak, laugh, and grow. Importantly, they hold space for adult teeth before they come in!  Early loss of baby teeth due to cavities can lead to more severe crowding of the adult teeth. Beyond this, however, keeping your child's teeth healthy can prevent pain and infection and also gives them the best chance of remaining cavity-free into adulthood!

How to Take Care of Baby Teeth

Your baby’s primary teeth are already in his or her mouth at birth; they are just invisible because they have not broken through the gums. Since they are already present, your baby can get cavities if you do not practice proper oral hygiene from the beginning.

  • Do not let your baby fall asleep with a bottle in his or her mouth.
  • Brush your child’s baby teeth twice a day as soon as they come in.
  • Floss your child’s teeth as soon as he or she has two teeth that touch.
  • Visit Carolina Pediatric Dentistry for your baby’s first checkup when the first tooth arrives.

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